Main menu

Can You Fire an Employee who Refuses to Participate in an Internal Investigation? The 2nd Circuit Says Yes.

When an employee is accused of misconduct, particularly when those allegations are criminal in nature, conducting an internal investigation is a best practice. But what is an organization to do when the alleged offender refuses to show up for an interview? May it go so far as to fire the employee, even if that means the employee loses out on benefits or other compensation? A recent case from the Second Circuit Court of Appeals says it can.

Dealing With Problem Employees—or Maybe Just Problems

We’d like to introduce Kim Levings, a management and leadership coach. What does this have to do with law? Most legal problems are personal—or personnel—problems gone to seed. Read Kim’s advice on how to deal with the weeds in your firm.

Case Exposes 12 Reasons to Have an Adequate Investigative Process

Recently, a court has allowed to go forward most of a case against the Roman Catholic Archbishop of San Francisco. The case alleges that the school did not investigate, refused to apply the ministerial exception defense, and did not find any formal religious decision-making process. What lessons can be learned here?

What Do I Do if Someone Files a False Report of Child Abuse?

In a perfect world, no one would file reports of child abuse unless they were really true. But it happens all the time—in fact, most of the reports that go to the Department of Human Services are unfounded. What should you do if a DHS caseworker shows up at your door?

Subscribe to this RSS feed

© Telios Law