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Questions and Questionnaires, Part 6

Opinions about moral questions have shifted tremendously during the past half-century. Theresa discusses the implications of moral issues in employment for your ministry and how you can respond.

Questions and Questionnaires, Part 5

In this post, Dr. Lindquist offers some thoughts on developing the skill of asking good questions and raises the question of how to treat moral issues at an organizational policy level.

Questions and Questionnaires, Part 3

In this post, Dr. Brent Lindquist asks Theresa how to handle the delicate situation where a candidate gives relevant information that you didn’t ask for.

Questions and Questionnaires, Part 2

In Part Two of the thread on Questions and Questionnaires, Theresa Sidebotham gives an overview of whether certain types of questions in employment pre-screening for missions are likely to implicate legal issues.

Questions and Questionnaires, Part 1

What are acceptable questions for pre-screening questionnaires? In this post, Dr. Brent Lindquist raises this and other issues for Theresa to answer. 

Part 6: Legal Problems with Pre-Employment Evaluations

There has been a lot of back and forth about how the mission must take care during prefield screening not to run afoul of the ADA. I agree. Under the ADA, before you can give an applicant a “medical examination,” which includes most psychological screenings, you have to first consider all the non-medical information and hand out a conditional offer.

Part 5: Comments on Testing by Dr. R.P. Ascano

Many examining psychologists are not aware of the existence of 29 CFR § 1630.13, titled “Prohibited medical examinations and inquiries.”  Even more importantly, section 1630.10, “Qualification standards, tests, and other selection criteria,” discusses the types of tests that can be used. 

Part 4: Legal Issues Related to Assessments

AssessmentsI see a number of legal issues around assessments. Some assessments are designed to give insight into personality or leadership styles. Those are fine. Others, like the MMPI, are designed to identify pathology. These raise a host of problems

Part 3: Candidate Selection - Deciding Who Can Be a Missionary

On SafariBetween 1975 and 2005 I completed innumerable candidate assessments (I never counted them!). I was always pushed, at least in the beginnings of my relationships with a mission board, or when a new candidate person came on board, to tell them if the person should be a missionary, or not

Part 2: Why Pay Attention

Recessi AnnieThere are many potential ethical problems in mission for psychologists with professional licenses. And if you get caught up in these ethical problems, you may do real harm to people, you may be liable for malpractice, and you could lose your professional license. 

Part 1: Assessments and Legal and Ethical Psychology in Missions

As a mental health practitioners trying to help further the cause of missions, I will be looking at issues as they develop in the arenas of assessment, overseas behavior and treatment, and contexts where you find cross-cultural and organizational cultural issues. I also want to discuss how to work with missions in the most effective way, looking at specific kinds of assessments and the ministerial exception.I am hoping, Theresa, that I will surface issues that you may be able to speak to from a legal perspective. 

Part 7: Prayer Requests and GINA, ADA, & HIPAA

HIPAABrent, I agree your problem with GINA is now way bigger. In fact, you have defined a problem that pulls in HIPAA (because of confidential medical information) and the ADA (to the extent the person has a disability) as well! 

Part 3: Prefield Screening - Practicing Psychology

GINA has nothing to do with what you do in private counseling practice. It applies to you when you are doing assessment for the employer. There are two ways for an employer to get in trouble with GINA. 

Part 2: Prefield Screening - Brent Responds to GINA

responding to GINAAll righty…there are so many issues here, and most of them are overwhelming to me. I have many questions about GINA as they relate to my consultation and therapeutic practices with mission agencies and their clients. I will list the topics... 

Part 1: Prefield Screening - a statute with a cute little name

GINA is 7 years old now, but she’s not a sweet little girl. The acronym stands for the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, passed in 2008, and it is intended to prevent employers from acquiring genetic information about employees and/or discriminating against them on that basis, particularly using that information in the hiring process. Sounds like a no-brainer. As we acquire more genetic information about ourselves, we don’t want it used against us. 

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