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In and Out of Court - Litigation & Appeals Blog

In and Out of Court - Litigation & Appeals Blog

Should I File an Appeal?

Should I file an appeal? Many considerations come into play when making this decision, and here are some thoughts that may steer you in the right direction:

Ethical Considerations as Trial Counsel When You Don’t Want to Take the Appeal

Imagine you see the notice come in from the court on your latest case: Defendants’ motion for summary judgment has been granted and your client’s case is dismissed with prejudice. Your client has just lost the entire case—a case that you had litigated well. After dealing with the disappointment and post-judgment motions, you really feel it would be best for you to call it quits. 

Part Two: If You Have Been Trapped

In Part One of this series, we flagged some traps to keep on the lookout for when filing your notice of appeal. Hopefully, the tips in Part One are all you’ll ever need. But, because it happens to attorneys and pro se parties all the time, here are some suggestions if you find yourself faced with having potentially missed the deadline for filing the NOA.

Part One: Common Traps to Timely Filing a Notice of Appeal

For most direct appeals to the Colorado Court of Appeals, a notice of appeal is your gateway to the Court. The NOA must be filed within 49 days of the date of the entry of the judgment from which the party appeals. Seems easy, right? Unfortunately, many an unsuspecting attorney has found themselves in the horrifying position of having to explain to their client how they weren’t able to figure out such a “simple” calculation.

Seven Lessons from Lawsuit over Sex Abuse Accusations

GavelA Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of St. Louis, Rev. Jiang, was accused of sexually abusing a child. He denied having done it. The criminal case against Rev. Jiang was voluntarily dismissed by the prosecutor.

What is Christian Mediation? Should it Be in Your Contract?

Christian MediationChristian mediation has a foot in two worlds: the peacemaking role of the Church, and the typical legal process for resolving legal disputes short of trial. It can be both spiritually healing and a cost-saving way of approaching problems.

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