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What is the Telios Tip?

The “Telios Tip” is Telios Law’s monthly e-newsletter, providing informative resources, tips, and case updates to help you navigate the ever-changing legal arena. Currently, we offer Telios Tips in three practice areas: Religion & Ministry Law, Appellate & Litigation Practice, and Legal Updates for Businesses. Our Religion & Ministry Law Telios Tip often features updates on the latest cases affecting religious organizations, as well as helpful resources for ministries on a variety of topics. Our Appellate Practice Telios Tip features updates on court rule changes and important case summaries, as well as tips and resources for improving practice before the appellate courts. Finally, our Business Telios Tip provides easy-to-understand and relevant content for businesses looking to make a difference in their community. To take advantage of one, or all, of these free legal resources, sign up using the forms below!

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Coercing Strip-Searching of Children and Child Endangerment

camera phoneTelios Law represents a family in El Paso County that has sued the Board of County Commissioners and others in federal court, claiming that the County’s Department of Human Services violated constitutional rights when its caseworker ordered Y.C. Doe to pull down her pants for photographs of bruises from a spanking.

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Reporting Child Abuse is Critical and Complex

Reporting child abuse is complex and important. Failure to report abuse can leave children at risk. Still, be wise before picking up the phone. An error in one direction may leave a child abused or make you criminally liable. An error in the other direction may damage a family, ruin a career, or expose you to a defamation lawsuit. 

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Don't Ask Me to Be Your Facebook Friend: New Social Media Law in Colorado

With the amount of information that exists about people on the web, naturally employers are tempted to check up on it, for purposes of hiring, evaluations, and firing.  Some employers take this to the level of requesting, even requiring, current or prospective employees to give their passwords or allow access onto their profiles. At least in Colorado, this practice must come to a screeching halt.

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Has the School Properly Tested Your Child?

Getting a good evaluation for a child with disabilities can be a challenge. Mark C. Weber’s article, “All Areas of Suspected Disability,” published in 2013, provides valuable insight into the current state of the law on evaluating children with disabilities. If you have a child where an inadequate evaluation is an issue, this is worth reading. Courts have stepped into the area of tension between the requirements of IDEA and the low-level “reasonable benefit” standard we got from the Supreme Court, and usually held in favor of parents when children have not been evaluated properly.

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How Do I Know How Much This Case is Worth?

Plaintiffs and defendants both need to have an idea how much a case is worth. If you are thinking about filing a case as a plaintiff, you need to know if it will be worth going through the hassle, emotional stress, and costs. You need to know whether you should settle, and for how much, or if you should take the case to trial. If you are a defendant, you need to know what kind of financial impact the case could have. You must know what you are up against, when a settlement offer is reasonable, and when it is too much to pay.

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Forbidding or Allowing Student Religious Speech

One challenge in figuring out what religious speech is permitted for students is that it depends on whether the school is trying to prevent the speech or allow it. A January 2013 Second Circuit case, A.M. v. Taconic Hills Central School District, gives some insight, though it is a summary order that is not precedential.

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Defending America's Essence: Did Government Violate Muslim Prisoners Rights?

A group of eight Muslim men detained in the aftermath of 9/11 filed claims against a number of government officials in a case called Turkmen v. Ashcroft, including then-Attorney General John Ashcroft from the Department of Justice (DOJ), the Director of the FBI, the Commissioner of the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), and personnel at the detention center where they were held. Ultimately, the Muslim men were charged with immigration violations, but not terrorism.

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Why Would I Sue the Government?

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Can you sue the government? Even if you can, why would you want to?

In answer to the first question, you can sue (or file some kind of legal action) against “the government” in certain limited situations.

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