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Part 2 Case Analysis: Costs and Benefits of Litigating a Case

Many of our potential clients are sure that they want to file a lawsuit, but few have actually thought through—or even realize—the many costs and benefits to doing so. Before filing a lawsuit, you should do a cost-benefit analysis. Identify and then weigh the pros and cons. This seven-part series explores some things to consider when deciding whether a lawsuit is the best way to go.

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C.A.R.—the 2016 Model: Recent Changes to the Colorado Appellate Rules

The Colorado Supreme Court has been hard at work, handing down multiple changes to the Colorado Appellate Rules. Some changes were significant. Others were minor. The most notable change to the Colorado Appellate Rules was to Rule 3.4: Appeals from Proceedings in Dependency or Neglect. For cases filed after July 1, 2016, appeals from these proceedings will get a major overhaul. Here are some of the significant changes in the rules.

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Part 1 Case Analysis: Do I have any basis for filing a lawsuit?

Many of our potential clients are sure that they want to file a lawsuit, but few have actually thought through—or even realize—the many costs and benefits to doing so. Before filing a lawsuit, you should do a cost-benefit analysis. Identify and then weigh the pros and cons. This seven-part series explores some things to consider when deciding whether a lawsuit is the best way to go.

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Part 6: Legal Problems with Pre-Employment Evaluations

There has been a lot of back and forth about how the mission must take care during prefield screening not to run afoul of the ADA. I agree. Under the ADA, before you can give an applicant a “medical examination,” which includes most psychological screenings, you have to first consider all the non-medical information and hand out a conditional offer.

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Update to "Conservatives Counseling Gay or Lesbian Clients"

A few years back, values-based referrals by counselors were proper under the American Counseling Association (ACA) Code of Ethics if done tactfully, so as not to wound the client, and were ethically permissible if the therapist, because of personal beliefs, could not provide what the client was seeking. Since we first reported on this issue, several big changes have altered that premise, most importantly, a major change in the ACA Code of Ethics.

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