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Released-Time Offers Fresh Choices in Religious Education

Moss v. Spartanburg County School District Seven, a June 2012 Fourth Circuit case, expands possibilities for religious education for public school students. The main educational paradigms in the United States are public school, private school, and home school. Conventional wisdom holds that religious education takes place more effectively in the second two. But released-time is a viable option for religious education within the public school paradigm.

In released-time, a public school student is released from campus for a class period to take religious instruction off-campus. While such programs must meet certain requirements, when they do so, they are consistently held constitutional. Typically, the students do not get credit for classes, and at least one case, Lanner v. Wimmer, was critical of the credit option.

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Can an Attorney or Parent Advocate Add Value in a Special Education Dispute?

Often, parents come talk to us about their special education matter and end up deciding that it costs too much to hire an attorney. Often, we talk to parents in situations where a child's education has been wrecked for years, often beyond repair. We wish we could have helped them sooner. This raises questions. When do you need an attorney or parent advocate? When would an attorney add value to your child's life that outweighs the cost?

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Part 1: Labor Unions at Christian Colleges? NLRB Thinks So.

Christian CollegeCan you have a union at a religious college? Only if the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) can exercise its jurisdiction over faculty members. NLRB has tried to do this several times. Shortly before Christmas in 2014, the NLRB developed a new test that lets it take jurisdiction over the faculty at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU).

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What to Do After Your Child has been Diagnosed With a Disability

Special KidYou leave the doctor’s office more confused than when you walked in! You have more questions to ask, but your head is swimming. There is no way the doctor could be right—or could she? Being told that your child has a disability or developmental delay is hard news for any parent to take and involves a grieving process as well as tough decisions to make. Each child and his or her condition is unique; different disabilities take a different path. So what do you do now? How can you best help your child, whom you now know has special needs

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