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The “Telios Tip” is Telios Law’s monthly e-newsletter, providing informative resources, tips, and case updates to help you navigate the ever-changing legal arena. Currently, we offer Telios Tips in three practice areas: Religion & Ministry Law, Appellate & Litigation Practice, and Legal Updates for Businesses. Our Religion & Ministry Law Telios Tip often features updates on the latest cases affecting religious organizations, as well as helpful resources for ministries on a variety of topics. Our Appellate Practice Telios Tip features updates on court rule changes and important case summaries, as well as tips and resources for improving practice before the appellate courts. Finally, our Business Telios Tip provides easy-to-understand and relevant content for businesses looking to make a difference in their community. To take advantage of one, or all, of these free legal resources, sign up using the links to registration forms below.

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Here at Telios Law we define successful results in terms of helping organizations be whole or complete. It shows as we roll out cloud-based Telios Teaches courses on the Thinkific platform.

Our first curriculum comes from our employment lawyers on how to best prepare your ministry or church to prevent or address sexual harassment and discrimination. We anticipate adding more courses.

With an annual subscription one member can view and take all Telios Teaches courses. That member can then enroll however many other individuals desired. Each subsequent student receives their seat in a course at a discounted price of $49.99. By having the ability to customize how many students you want enrolled in what courses, you're always only paying for what your group needs. A subscription is not necessary to take a course as an individual.

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Part 7: Open Communication and Impartiality in Investigations

This is quite helpful Theresa. I think the biggest issue here, is, wait for it, …communication! Part of me still struggles with wondering if it is possible to investigate a complaint by a party, gather information through an investigation through all parties, and end up by determining that the complaining party is more the problem than anyone else. 

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Part 5: It Really is About Confidentiality and Trust in the Investigation

trust and confidenceIn your hypothetical, there is already a lack of mutual trust. Tom and Sally are seen as being perpetual complainers. And your mission leader isn’t consistent. He “usually” investigates and doesn’t have a methodical approach. So what do complainants have the right to know about the progress of an investigation and what is the effect of trust issues with leadership? 

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Part 4: Complaints, Protection, Confidentiality and Trust

trusting leadersI can see where if you deal with complaints in a regular process, and document them, it makes for good protection. Two comments, though, one about confidentiality, and one about trust. In a perfect world, people see leadership as benevolent, compassionate, trustworthy (don’t laugh! I am going somewhere with this!). However, the reality is that we each project our own ... 

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Part 1: Opening a Can of Worms - Investigations, Whistle-Blowing and Retaliation

Retaliation or whistle-blower lawsuits are the hottest thing in employment litigation, and missions should be aware of this. Good policies are important.  Missions should encourage internal reporting of the violation of these policies, and have a well-defined investigation process. Leaders should also know how to avoid issues with retaliation, including how to deal with troublemakers. Read More→

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“Easy” Ways to Inoculate Your Child Against Abuse

child protectionI am always amazed at how easy these management issues become once an organization (or family) implements them. I got to thinking about some of the ways a parent can act and relate that can help prepare their child to not be abused. I think of four behaviors right away: 1) On the radar, 2) Chatter, 3) Buddy, and 4) Touch. 

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More About Childhood Trauma from Child Sexual Abuse

childrenThe evil of child sexual abuse is not defined by the immediate reactions of the child. Even if the child does not immediately experience it as negative, intervention and healing is needed. We cannot defy our biology, which shows that our brains do not mature until late in adolescence, and we need mature brains to make reasoned choices from the options we are given. 

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