Commandments: Law and Religion Blog

To curb the spread of the COVID-19, many states have banned large gatherings. What does this mean for churches? Can the government force churches to cancel services? What are the legal consequences if churches refuse?

The EEOC abandoned its policy disfavoring mandatory arbitration for employment disputes. The new policy is now consistent with current case law. This post addresses what employers need to know.

In a guest post by Scott Brawner, he discusses how pandemics are tough on the decision-making process for organization leadership teams. This is, in part, because organizations are dealing with issues and concerns of safety vs. security. While threats to security can arise from safety incidents like pandemics, the key concerns of a pandemic are rooted in issues of safety.

We'd like to share a guest quiz by Christianity Today's "Church Law & Tax" weekly update. By filling it out, you can help them to more directly gauge the occurrence of sexual harassment in churches and ministries. Responses will be kept strictly confidential, and participants will receive a free download resource in exchange for their time spent assisting us.

Church security is more important than ever. Here are some practical steps to take and legal issues to consider in planning for security at your church, as well as philosophical approaches.

There are many ways fraud can be committed at a nonprofit organization. The one thing all types of fraud have in common, however, is that they involve a violation of trust. And nowhere is the damage from that violation more acute than in not-for-profit organizations, which by their very nature and purpose are part of the public trust. Learn more about how to prevent fraud in a guest post and questionnaire by CapinCrouse!

A religious organization was accused of protecting a known pedophile within its organization. How can an organization stay on the right side of the law and be sure that it protects children?

Federal and state laws prohibit specific types of employment screening, but how do these laws apply for religious organizations, and are there exceptions?

Reporting international crimes is not as straightforward as it seems. There are factors to consider, such as what kind of crime it is, what jurisdiction it falls under, and what agency is responsible.

The annual report from the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom is an excellent source to examine religious freedom violations abroad, and provides policy recommendations to lawmakers.