Child Abuse

A white paper by Theresa Lynn Sidebotham, Esq. and Roger L. Dixon, M. Div., Th.M., Ph.D. about biblical ethics and responding to child abuse. 

Sexual harassment and abuse create tragic stories for individuals and organizations. How do we prevent abusive or harassing behavior by basic best practices?

A Florida preschool recently learned a hard lesson about the importance of good child protection.

This article was published in the 2014 Evangelical Missionary Society's annual publication number 22 called The Missionary Family: Witness, Concerns, Care.

Failing in the child protection arena has two possible worst-case outcomes for organizations. You need to get these policies right the first time. Organizations need to work on their child protection policies. 

A white paper by Theresa Lynn Sidebotham, Esq. about how religious organizations must devote time, energy, and money to prevent, stop, and heal abuse whenever it is found. This paper examines the current landscape of this kind of abuse, then it addresses prevention and wise approaches to investigations.

I am always amazed at how easy these management issues become once an organization (or family) implements them. I got to thinking about some of the ways a parent can act and relate that can help prepare their child to not be abused. I think of four behaviors right away: 1) On the radar, 2) Chatter, 3) Buddy, and 4) Touch. 

For abuse to happen, three factors must be present. First, there must be a perpetrator who desires to abuse. Second, there must be a child who will take the role of a victim. Third, there must be an environment that provides enough privacy for the perpetrator to act. If prevention and training can stop any one of the three factors necessary for child sexual abuse, the abuse will not happen.

A multi-chapter resource by Theresa Lynn Sidebotham, Esq. and Dr. Brent Lindquist about the trauma caused by child sexual abuse.

When a dependency and neglect case is on the juvenile court docket, things have already gone wrong with the child and his or her family. Tangled relationships and unhealthy situations are almost certain. Although the court is entrusted with protecting the best interests of the child, other parties have certain rights and obligations.

People connected with the child may be joined in the case, either voluntarily or involuntarily. Those involuntarily joined are “respondents” and “special respondents.” Respondents are parties and include parents, guardians, and legal custodians who are alleged to have abused or neglected the child.1 ... Read More →