Case Analysis

If you’ve stuck with this series, by now you’ve answered most of the tough questions. In this post, we’ll leave you with the upsides of going to court. Here are a few points that might demonstrate you are ready to file:

In this post, we consider other ways to get relief besides filing a lawsuit. You can see now that filing a lawsuit is a huge commitment of time and money for you and the lawyer. You can explore other ways to accomplish your goals. A lawyer can help you discover and implement alternatives to litigation. Here are some common options:

In addition to considering whether you have a claim, and whether it is worth it to bring the case financially against this particular defendant, you should also think about other risks involved in filing a lawsuit. Any time you litigate, you are taking it up a notch. You are exposing yourself to scrutiny through discovery; your intimate personal life may become public; your family may be questioned about the incident; and you will have to commit emotional energy and relive (over and over again) the details of the incident that led to you filing in the first place. 

Who do you want to sue? This person or group will be the defendant. Who this is matters in deciding whether to sue. In this post, we’ll explore why this matters. Some people are immune from suit, and a lawsuit is not a viable option. Sometimes the person you want to sue has no money, or is about to file for bankruptcy, and you have no chance of collecting any judgment you may get. Or the defendant may have a reputation for fighting lawsuits tooth and nail, or their lawyers may have a bad reputation. Factors like this can make a big difference.

We are exploring the costs and benefits to filing a lawsuit in this seven-part series. If you have not read parts 1 or 2, start here.

Many of our potential clients are sure that they want to file a lawsuit, but few have actually thought through—or even realize—the many costs and benefits to doing so. Before filing a lawsuit, you should do a cost-benefit analysis. Identify and then weigh the pros and cons. This seven-part series explores some things to consider when deciding whether a lawsuit is the best way to go.

Many of our potential clients are sure that they want to file a lawsuit, but few have actually thought through—or even realize—the many costs and benefits to doing so. Before filing a lawsuit, you should do a cost-benefit analysis. Identify and then weigh the pros and cons. This seven-part series explores some things to consider when deciding whether a lawsuit is the best way to go.

Plaintiffs and defendants both need to have an idea how much a case is worth. If you are thinking about filing a case as a plaintiff, you need to know if it will be worth going through the hassle, emotional stress, and costs. You need to know whether you should settle, and for how much, or if you should take the case to trial. If you are a defendant, you need to know what kind of financial impact the case could have. You must know what you are up against, when a settlement offer is reasonable, and when it is too much to pay.

Why would you hire an attorney rather than do it yourself with help from a CD or website? Aside from providing knowledge and skills you may not have, a good attorney should help you by thinking in certain ways. Let’s examine some of those ways.

Attorneys and sometimes other intellectuals get teased that they “think like a lawyer.” (Perhaps the real problem is “talking like a lawyer,” which is boring, incomprehensible, or both.) “Thinking like a lawyer” is the point of three expensive years of law school.